Google Search: The Gatekeeper’s Riddles

In today’s blog entry, I go through how to use the proper Google syntax that will allow you to enter the most concise query possible to find what you’re looking for. This will help you save time in your everyday life, as well as become more effective performing professional/academic research. Here are some hacks for the Google Search Engine:

How would you search for an exact word or phrase?

When searching for an exact word, just type it in.

When searching for an exact phrase, you should enclose the entire phrase in quotation marks. The quotation tells Google to search for the precise keywords in the prescribed order.If you just search the phrase then Google might return the exact phrase, but it will also search the words in the phrase in a different order 

Example: “The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog”

 

How would you search for something on a specific site?

You can search for a specific word or phrase by using the modifier:  word/phrase in quotes site:website.com

Example: rabbits site:time.com

 

How would you correctly search for a definition?

You can search for a definition by using the modifier: define: search word. Google even displays slang words or acronyms.

Example: define: superfluous

 

How would you search for a specific product available within a specific price range?

You can search for a specific product available within a specific price by using the modifier: product name $lowest..$highest

Example: flat iron $10..$120

 

How would you search for a specific filetype?

To search for a specific filetype use the modifier: word/phrase in quotes filetype: 

An example: “content marketing” filetype:ppt. This will search the topic of content marketing in a PowerPoint format

 

How would you include or ignore words in your search?

To include words in your search, you could use the tilde symbol or write AND followed by the word you would like to include. The following modifiers: word and word OR word~word

Example: cats and hats or cats~hats

To ignore words in your search, you could use a hyphen in front of the term or site you want to leave out.The following modifiers: word-word OR word-site:website.com

Example: cats -hats or cats -site:wikipedia.org

 

How would you find sites/pages similar to an existing one?

To find sites/pages similar to an existing one, use the following modifier: related:www.yourwebsite.com

Example: related:wikipedia.org

 

How would you confirm the exact form of a quote even if you were missing some of the words?

To confirm the exact form of a quote even if you were missing some of the words, you should add an asterisk (*) as the placeholder for the missing term. 

Example: Innovation * between a * and a follower for the quote “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower”

 

How would search for pages containing two connected words?

To search for pages containing two connected words, you would use the term OR in between the words. The following modifier: word or word

Example: machine or fire

 

How would you search for social media content containing a specific tag?

To search for a social media content containing a specific tag, you should use the octothorpe (#) symbol or commercial at (@) symbol followed by the specific tag you are looking for.

Example: #CEID100 or @oakhtareid100

To search for social media content containing a specific tag on a specific social site, you would have to use the octothorpe (#) symbol or commercial at (@) symbol in combination with the site function (previously mentioned) where site is followed by colon and site you want to search within.

Example: #CEID100 site:twitter.com or @oakhtareid100 site:twitter.com

 

 

Sources:

Hoskins, G. 2017. CEID100 Course Materials: Module 1. Ryerson University.

Que Publishing. (n.d.). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from http://www.quepublishing.com/articles/article.aspx?p=675274

11 Google Tricks That Will Change the Way You Search. (n.d.). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from http://motto.time.com/4116259/google-search/

How to Search on Google: 31 Advanced Google Search Tips. (n.d.). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from https://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/1264/12-quick-tips-to-search-google-like-an-expert.aspx#sm.0001ciqvymwyse0uqoj2h646zcqut

Is there a tool for finding similar websites? (n.d.). Retrieved January 27, 2017, from https://www.quora.com/Is-there-a-tool-for-finding-similar-websites

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